Because I am a Woman

This blog is about sex-positivity, sex-ed, feminism, reproductive justice, birth justice, intersectionality, and activism. Because I am a Woman features articles, news, opinion pieces, digital media, and original information posts on all of the topics and more.

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Recent Tweets @@bciamawoman
Growing up, I didn’t read novels by women. It’s not that I didn’t want to. It’s almost like I didn’t think that I needed to or, I guess, I didn’t know that I needed to. I was perfectly happy in a world contained by men. I adopted the posture of the brooding male as my own. I was Salinger, I was Kerouac, I was any male protagonist in a novel that one of my boyfriends recommended. I didn’t know that there was a specific female sadness so I was content with relating to a generalized one. And in a way, reading these novels was less of a way to relate and more of a way to learn how to be the type of girl that these male novelists liked. One of my first ambitions wasn’t to be a writer – it was to be a writer’s muse.

toneyspeaksloud:

Nicki Minaj shining a light on the differences on acceptable sexuality from white women and black women.

While it has a good deal to do with color, it also has to do with the fact of how her sexuality is used.

The women above her could arguably be said to be catering to the sexual needs/wants/fantasies of men (Sports Illustrated is ESPECIALLY known for catering to a male gaze.)  While Nicki Minaj has continuously used her sexuality to empower herself.  Her sexuality isn’t for men, it’s for her own self.  And THAT is a huge problem.  Sexuality that isn’t designed for male consumption is deemed unacceptable and threatening.  She is powerful, demanding, uncompromising, and men are weak, so that scares them.

And it’s also because she’s of Indian/Black background, no doubt about it.  It’s not just racist, it’s also sexist.

(via theriotmag)

shewontreally:

Luna and I went to a small farmers market down town and came across this beautiful street art.

(via hollabackboston)

marinashutup on feminism

"BUT WHAT ABOUT THE MEN?!" - Is Feminism Sexist? (x)

(via pridenotprejudice)