Because I am a Woman

This blog is about sex-positivity, sex-ed, feminism, reproductive justice, birth justice, intersectionality, and activism. Because I am a Woman features articles, news, opinion pieces, digital media, and original information posts on all of the topics and more.

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Posts tagged "Feminism"
Asker Anonymous Asks:
Why do most of the feminist movement refuses to identify Beyonce as feminists? I honestly don't understand this. Could you explain it to me, please?
becauseiamawoman becauseiamawoman Said:

Honestly, I’m not sure  what you’re talking about. Beyonce is pretty widely celebrated as a feminist at this point. I’d say that claiming that “most of the feminist movement” refuses to identify her a feminist is a pretty big stretch. 

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Poehler and the show’s writers could have chosen to make Leslie comically strident, which in turn, would make her feminist stances outsized and rife for mockery. And that would be a real drag, truth be told. Instead (thankfully), Leslie’s feminism is marbleized into the show’s narrative, making her desire to advocate for gender equality, to encourage women to support one another, and to teach girls how to empower themselves, organic. There is nothing surprising about Leslie bringing her girlfriends together on February 13th for Galentine’s Day, a day to celebrate and honor the great gal pals in your life. She and her best friend Ann (played by Rashida Jones) are equals. They show up for one another and stick to the “ovaries before brovaries” code while other characterizations of female relationships inevitably show women pitted against one another in pursuit of boys, jobs, or other women. Even the show’s male figures like the human puppy dog, Andy Dwyer (Chris Pratt) and Ron Swanson (Nick Offerman) align themselves with feminist ideals. Andy’s foray into college finds himself drawn to a Woman’s Studies class; Ron acknowledges the influence of strong women upon him and finds his romantic match in a self-reliant, smart, successful woman played, unsurprisingly, by the badass Lucy Lawless.

I can’t fault brands for keeping the spotlight on these important cultural issues, but many ads employing female-empowering messages, especially the beauty brands, seem to be simply couching their backward-thinking messages in new packaging. For example, Pantene’s “Not Sorry” ad, which has over 13 million views on YouTube, tells women to stop apologizing, assert their strength, and refuse to downplay their opinions and expertise—a meaningful and important message. But it all comes back to beauty, as the description of the ad explains, “When you’re strong on the inside, you shine on the outside. And that’s a beautiful thing.” Along the same lines, Dove’s “Movement for Self-Esteem” seemed to be singularly based on helping young girls boost confidence by making them “feel beautiful”: the brand supported its program with a survey concluding that only 4 percent of women worldwide considered themselves beautiful and, of the 1,200 girls ages 10-17 in the survey, about 11 percent of girls felt comfortable using the word beautiful to describe their appearances. I’m inclined to say “So what? What percent of those girls would use the word smart, fierce, talented, etc, to describe themselves? That seems like a more important measurement of their confidence.”

My point is this: Dove and Pantene continue to equate the pursuit of beauty with the pursuit of happiness and confidence, making a direct connection with exterior appearances and interior fulfillment. According to their ads, “looking confident” and “feeling beautiful” are really half the battle. A woman’s appearance is still a critical component of her strength and authority, and there’s nothing empowering about that message.

You can totally be a feminist who has insecurities. Feminism isn’t about pretending we all feel like Wonder Woman, it’s about being honest when we don’t, and having the conversation on why that is.
 Tavi Gevinson (via queerintersectional)

(via huffingtonpostwomen)

All of this is typical girl-fear. Once you realize that The Exorcist is, essentially, the story of a 12-year-old who starts cussing, masturbating, and disobeying her mother—in other words, going through puberty—it becomes apparent to the feminist-minded viewer why two adult men are called in to slap her around for much of the third act. People are convinced that something spooky is going on with girls; that, once they reach a certain age, they lose their adorable innocence and start tapping into something powerful and forbidden. Little girls are sugar and spice, but women are just plain scary. And the moment a girl becomes a woman is the moment you fear her most. Which explains why the culture keeps telling this story.

Rookie, The Season of the Witch

For readings on the correlation in horror between puberty and the monstrous, see:

I will add Carol Clover’s Men, Women, and Chain Saws here, although she’s concerned more with identification, monstrous-feminine as men’s horror, and the maternal aspects of possession tales (including a section on possession as oral penetration). Although both Creed and Clover are important feminist horror theorists who work in Psychoanalytical lenses, Barbara Creed talks more about transformation than Carol Clover does. And transformation is key to horror movies about how women are terrifying.

For variations on a theme, watch Ginger Snaps, Carrie, and Teeth together.

(Bonus: here is Kristeva’s Powers of Horror: an Essay on Abjection for free online)

I’m 90000% sure I wrote the text below this but it doesn’t link to (probably ff) anywhere. it’s important to keep sources in posts so that you don’t disorient authors about their own pasts,

(via rgr-pop)

(via indielowercase)

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Feminists often judge women on how they dress. If a woman wears too much, she's oppressed. If she's half or fully naked... She's either sexually empowered or objectified. How do you determine which label to give a woman who doesn't wear a lot of clothes?
becauseiamawoman becauseiamawoman Said:

How about we don’t give women any labels they don’t give themselves. 

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Because I am a Woman works hard to bring you original content on all things feminism— but we can’t do it alone. Below you will find a (now expanded and updated) list of resources that we personally recommend listed by subject matter in alphabetical order. You can also find our own work on these topics under our Original Posts tab as well as in some of the sections below.

Anything we’re missing? Feel free to let us know! This list is meant to be an ever-growing and expanding resource for our readers, and input is always appreciated. 

Abortion

Birth Justice And Birth Work

Body Image

Employment in Sex Ed, Social Justice or Activism

Feminism
Gender, Diversity and Representation in the Media
Girls & Girlhood
  • Smart Girls at the Party: An online community for young girls and the young at heart, which encourages women in volunteerism, activism, cultural exchange, and self-expression through the arts.
  • Spark Movement: A grassroots, girl-run movement empowering young women to talk back to sexualized images of girls in media and assert their right to a healthy sexuality.
LGBTQ

Parenting and Pregnancy

Pornography

Privilege

Race, Racism and Racial Justice

Re-Usable/ Eco-Friendly Menstrual Products

Self-Care

Sexual Assault 

Sexuality And Sexual Health

Sexual Pleasure and Sex-Positivity:

Sex Toys:

Sex Work:

  • Sex Workers Project: An organization providing legal and social services to those in sex work, regardless of how they got into it.
  • HIPS: A DC-based organization that “promotes the health, rights, and dignity of individuals and communities impacted by sexual exchange and/or drug use due to choice, coercion, or circumstance.”  
Sustainable Sex

To get involved in the causes on this blog: