Because I am a Woman

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Posts tagged "periods"
Asker Anonymous Asks:
What is your experience wit reusable pads? Do they work? thanks x
becauseiamawoman becauseiamawoman Said:

Of course! They’re a bit more of a hassle since you have to clean them, but I was able to make it work even when I was living with four roommates. They’re also a lot more comfortable (and environmentally friendly!) in my opinion.

Here are some related links pulled from our resource section:

  • Cloth Pads via LunaPads
  • Patterns to make your own cloth pads: [1] [2] [3
Asker Anonymous Asks:
Same anon as before: Hm, the holes might be the problem then. They are not clear, but I don't know how to get them clear either. I rinse and boil my cup, but they still won't get clear. Maybe I'm just doing it wrong. (Well, obviously I must be doing something wrong, I just don't know what...)
becauseiamawoman becauseiamawoman Said:

When I was using my cup I’d occasionally use a toothpick to clear out the holes. Maybe give that a shot?

EDIT [Noteworthy advice from the comments]: the-femme-feminist said: Fill the cup with water, put one hand over the top of the cup to create a seal and with your other hand squeeze the cup so water shoots out the little holes, this will clear them for you

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Hi! Another anon: I've been using the cup for probably at least a year now, but I can't seem to get it right. It's still leaking (although not so much that I want to go back to tampoons, but still so I have to use pads as back-up). I've followed all the "rules"/tips - I can't figure out what's wrong. Do you or your followers have any ideas/have you experienced this too?
becauseiamawoman becauseiamawoman Said:

Hmm… I have a couple of thoughts here. The first is the seal—- are you sure you’re creating one? Make sure the holes around the cup are clear and that you’ve twisted the cup once you’ve inserted it! Next, is it possible it just needs to be dumped more often? Depending on your flow, it could just be getting too full.

Anybody else have any ideas here?

EDIT: I’ve been thinking on this, and now I’m also wondering if maybe you’re using the wrong size cup for your body. Definitely a possibility!

Asker Anonymous Asks:
Can you ask your followers if anyone has experience using the DivaCup or similar cup when they are a virgin? I'd like to spend less on products and be more environmentally friendly, but not having had sex yet, I'm worried using the cup will hurt.
becauseiamawoman becauseiamawoman Said:

Inserting a cup shouldn’t be much more uncomfortable than using a tampon. However, if you aren’t comfortable reaching into your vagina to insert and pull it out, this is probably not the best option for you.

Not having had penetrative sex doesn’t impact you ability to use a cup, in fact many menstrual cups come in smaller sizes for those who haven’t had penetrative sex or who just haven’t had children. If you end up deciding to purchase one, shop around for different sizes from different brands, (for example many people report that even the DivaCup’s smaller size runs larger than other cups). 

Lunette also has some great tips for teens/people who haven’t had penetrative sex which include instructions on inserting a cup for the first time:

Tips for first time insertion

  1. Relax and take your time:  Choose alone time when you can focus without distractions or interruptions.  Perhaps after a warm bath when you are relaxed. If you are too nervous, the vaginal muscles will tighten, making it uncomfortable, if not impossible, for successful insertion.
  2. Get Acquainted with yourself:  It is always a good idea to know your own body. Take some time to locate the vaginal opening and even insert a finger to locate your cervix.  It feels exactly like the tip of your nose.  Knowing where your cervix is will help you to position the cup properly and not insert it too high.
  3. Practice during your period:  The vagina is more flexible and the blood works as a lubricant.  OR …
  4. Take a “dry run” before your period:  You might be more comfortable practicing before your period if you feel squeamish about touching blood.  In this case, use water as a lubricant.
  5. Try different folds that accentuate the insertion point:  Most women use the typical C-fold.  However, there are many ways to fold a Lunette.  The video here will show you nine different folds.
  6. Proper insertion direction:  Be aware that the direction of insertion needs to be aimed towards the small of your back — not straight up.
  7. Be patient:  Know that it may take several times before you are successful. If you begin without the expectation of perfect insertion, you are more likely to be relaxed and pleasantly surprised when success happens.
  8. Assess the stem:  Once inserted, you will need to decide whether or not to keep the stem.  If it protrudes, it will be uncomfortable. In this case, you likely won’t need the stem and can trim it off.  However, if not, you may need it to assist with removal.
Asker Anonymous Asks:
I am thinking of getting a menstrual cup but can't afford a really expensive one. Do you have any experience of buying them from Amazon and if so which would you recommend and how long do they last? Also I'm a bit worried about putting it in and out :/ Is it easy? and can you were them over night? sorry so many questions lol
becauseiamawoman becauseiamawoman Said:

I haven’t bought off Amazon, but I know others who have and hear good things. These aren’t discounted brands or anything— these are the same cups you’ll find anywhere else just at a lower price. 

Cups can last years, but it will change from brand-to-brand and depends on how you use it and how you care for your cup.

You can read some our reviews/features of  various kinds of menstrual cups here:

These reviews include an explanation of insertion:

Many reviews liken insertion of the DivaCup to putting in a tampon, but that wasn’t something I had much experience with. However, it turned out to be even easier than I expected.To insert it, you simply fold the cup ( I used the“push down”  fold, but many users fold theirs into a “C” shape,) insert it, and twist it so that it creates a seal. To take it out, you just pull down on the stem and base of the cup. It is really that easy!

You can also keep your cup in overnight. For more information, check out our menstrual cups tag.

Asker Anonymous Asks:
any reasons why periods are early. last month it made sense because it was finals week and stressful ness but now it's another 10 days early. should I be worried
becauseiamawoman becauseiamawoman Said:

Changes in your period are normal, and can happen due to any number of things including stress, life changes, and diet changes. That being said, if you notice something that seems out of the ordinary for you and your body, you may want to consult your doctor. I wouldn’t worry too much at this point, but you’re better than sorry when it comes to your health. 

edforchoice:

Today is Menstrual Hygiene Day so we asked Chella Quint, who runs the #PeriodPositive project, to write us a guest blog-post on how to teach young people about menstruation. Here are a few of her tips!

http://educationforchoice.blogspot.co.uk/2014/05/teaching-about-periods-guest-post-from.html

Update - Chella says:I responded to comments about the word ‘femcare’ not including those who identify as trans, genderqueer or non-binary. Thank you very much - I believe strongly in peer-review and appreciate that a few people pointed out that this phrase is also a euphemism and is off message to the rest of the resource! In training sessions I use the phrases ‘menstrual products’  or ‘disposables and reusables’ and in this resource I have replaced ‘femcare’ with ‘products’.”